Scheduling
Reduce Precariousness, Not Flexibility
The Ontario Government is proposing that all employers will be required to pay a worker three hours of wages if they cancel a shift with less than 48 hours notice. A one-size-fits-all approach to scheduling fails to recognize the diversity of Ontario's economy, and will remove the flexibility that many part-time employees enjoy.
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What's this about?

The Ontario Government's Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs plan proposes that employers would be required to pay a worker three hours of wages if they cancel a shift with less than 48 hours notice. In addition employees can refuse to accept shifts without repercussion if their employer asks them to work with less than four days' notice. When employees are "on-call" and not called in to work, they must be paid three hours at their regular rate of pay. This would be required for each 24 hour period that employees are on-call. If a collective agreement is made between an employer and a union, the agreement would prevail in place of some of these new rules.

Our RecommendationS

A one-size-fits-all approach to scheduling fails to recognize the diversity of Ontario’s economy, and will remove the flexibility that many part-time employees enjoy. It has long been a reality in the Ontario economy that some sectors need more flexibility in scheduling than others.

Many businesses in the manufacturing sector, for example, must constantly adjust production in order to meet demand.The need for flexible scheduling is not limited to the manufacturing sector. The health sector is subject to surges in demand which must be met with an equivalent increase in staffing. Many employers in the sector noted it is impossible to predict how demand for health services will increase day-to-day, let alone two weeks in advance.

Take Action Now
Your voice will make a difference. Please write to the Government of Ontario today and let them know that you’re concerned about the potential impact of changes to our labour and employment laws. Send the letter below, or, for more impact, you can edit and personalize it with a specific recommendation about contract work, scheduling, sectoral bargaining, or any other issue that will impact your business.